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Miss Chen
21 hours ago
Miss Chen
Bird's nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) are naturally epiphytic, meaning they grow on the surface of other plants. In their rainforest homes, they can be found growing high in the crooks of trees. They form a series of erect, spoon-shaped, bright green fronds that rise from a central rosette. Healthy plants can have fronds up to 5 feet long, but bird's nest ferns kept as houseplants typically have fronds that grow only about 2 feet long. These ferns have a slow growth rate. They're best planted in the spring, though houseplants generally can be started year-round. Common Name Bird's nest fern, nest fern Botanical Name Asplenium nidus Family Aspleniaceae Plant Type Perennial Mature Size 3–5 ft. tall, 2–3 ft. wide Sun Exposure Partial, shade Soil Type Loamy, moist, well-drained Soil pH Acidic Bloom Time None Flower Color None Hardiness Zones 11–12, USA Native Area Asia, Australia, Africa Bird's Nest Fern Care The key to a healthy bird's nest fern is providing it with ample warmth, humidity, and moisture. When growing it as a houseplant, one of the best places to situate a bird's nest fern is near a shower or tub in a bathroom where it will receive optimal humidity and warmth, though it must have a light source as well.
New leaves will constantly emerge from the central area of the plant, which resembles a bird's nest. Do not touch, move, or handle the new, delicate fronds as they emerge from the center. They are extremely fragile, and if you touch them, there is a high chance of them becoming damaged or deformed. Light Bird’s nest ferns grow well in filtered sunlight to a moderate amount of shade. Don’t expose them to direct sunlight other than the very early morning sun. Harsh direct sunlight can burn the leaves. Indoors, an east- or north-facing window is ideal. Soil These plants like soil that’s loose and rich in organic matter with excellent drainage. A peat-based potting mix is good for container plants. Water The ferns prefer a consistent amount of soil moisture, but they don’t do well sitting in soggy soil. Water whenever the top inch of soil is dry. Avoid watering directly into the center of the plant, as this can encourage mold growth and rot in the dense nest. Aim water at the soil to avoid wetting the fern's fronds. Temperature and Humidity The bird’s nest fern thrives in warmth with temperatures between 60 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit. It can tolerate temperatures down to 50 degrees, but anything colder than that can harm the plant, especially with prolonged exposure. Indoors, be sure to protect your plant from cool drafts, such as air blowing from an air-conditioning vent. This fern prefers high humidity and moist environments, such as a bathroom, greenhouse, or terrarium. To raise the humidity around a bird’s nest fern, you can use a humidifier. Or you can set its pot on a tray filled with pebbles and water. But make sure the bottom of the pot isn’t sitting in the water because that can lead to root rot. Fertilizer During the fern's active growing season (April through September), fertilize once a month with a balanced liquid fertilizer that's diluted to half strength. Make sure to apply the fertilizer to the soil and not the fronds, as direct contact with fertilizer can burn foliage. Withhold fertilizer for the rest of the year because too much food can cause the fronds to have an abnormal shape or take on a yellowish or brownish color. Types of Bird's Nest Fern There are only a handful of varieties of bird’s nest ferns, which typically feature different leaf shapes. They include: Asplenium nidus 'Crispy Wave': Sword-shaped ruffled leaves Asplenium nidus 'Osaka': Narrow, strap-like leaves with rippled edges Asplenium nidus 'Antiquum': Wavy leaf margins Asplenium nidus 'Victoria': Long, wavy, tongue-shaped fronds Propagating Bird's Nest Fern Bird’s nest ferns can be tricky to propagate for beginner gardeners. Many people opt to purchase nursery plants instead, though propagating them yourself will save you some money. Propagation occurs via spores, which look like fuzzy brown spots on the undersides of fronds. When they look especially plump and fuzzy, that's when it's time to propagate. To collect the spores, cut off a frond with these spots and place it in a paper bag for a few days. The spores will drop into the bag. Next, add the spores on top of a container of sphagnum moss that’s placed in a water dish, so the moss will soak up the water. The moss should be moist throughout but not waterlogged. Cover the container with plastic wrap to keep the environment moist, and place it in a warm, shaded spot. Keep the dish filled with water, and mist the moss if it doesn't feel moist. Germination should occur in a few weeks. Potting and Repotting Bird's Nest Fern Bird's nest ferns must be potted in a container with ample drainage holes. As an epiphytic plant, bird's nest ferns are accustomed to growing with minimal potting media. So your plant generally won’t need repotting because its roots have run out of space. Instead, these ferns will need repotting once they’ve grown so large that they’re unstable in their pot and need a larger container to attach themselves to. This will typically occur every two to three years, and spring is the best time to repot. When it’s time to repot, select a container that's large enough to keep your plant stable. A clay container is often better than plastic to anchor the plant. Carefully loosen your plant from its previous pot, set it in the new pot at the same depth as it was before, and fill around it with fresh potting mix. Common Pests No serious disease or pest problems affect bird's nest ferns, though they can be affected by some insects common to houseplants, such as scale. Natural insecticidal soaps are the best solution to combat pest issues, since chemical pesticides will damage this plant's fragile leaves.
Common Problems With Bird's Nest Fern Bird's nest ferns are generally healthy plants, but they can be prone to a few issues that largely have to do with an improper environment. Leaves Turning Yellow Too much sun can cause the foliage of a bird's nest fern to turn yellow. Likewise, too much fertilizer also can cause yellowing. Check your plant throughout the day to make sure it's always in proper sunlight conditions. And adjust fertilization if necessary. Browning Tips Fronds naturally turn brown as they die and are replaced with fresh growth. But browning along the edges of a frond is often due to drafts hitting the plant. Move your fern away from air-conditioning vents and any drafty windows or doors.
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Miss Chen
21 hours ago
Miss Chen
在我国长江以南空气湿度高、昼夜温差小的地区,对于大多数花卉植物来说,即使短期内无人照管也不影响生长。但北方则不然,哪怕是几天的怠慢,这些绿色植物就会失去生机。有什么办法能够让植株正常生长呢?有些人在外出之前,往往天真地把花盆底部的排水孔堵死,然后向花盆里浇足水,以为这样植物在短期内就不会缺水,其实这种做法反而会抑制植物根部的呼吸,导致“窒息”而死。可采取如下办法保潮,免使盆花干渴遭受损失:
1、外出时间短的可将所有盆花和吊盆花卉浇足水后都放在背阴无风处,以减少蒸发。有条件的可在盆土表层铺一层湿青苔,如盖上一张塑料薄膜,则保潮时间较长。 2、如外出时间较长时,可将盆花放在大浅瓷盘中,然后在盘中填满湿细沙,并估计归来时间,适当地在细沙中浇些水。 3、在花盆旁放一水盆,水盆略低于花盆。将一条厚布带,一端浸在水盆中,另一端压在花盆孔底下,由于厚布带的毛细管作用,水盆中水分可徐徐上升浸润花盆底,滋润盆土。根据盆花喜湿情况调节厚布带的宽度。此法保湿时间更长。 4、利用深盆蒸发法效果更好,尤其适用于那些需要高湿环境的观叶植物,如白网纹草、竹芋类以及观叶秋海棠类。找一个略高于植株高度的深槽,放一浅层水,把花盆置于其中,花盆下稍垫起即可。
5、还可以用一大而透明的塑料袋将浇过透水的盆花套住,注意开口向下,以保证底部透气。以上方法能维持l周至10天左右不浇水。如外出10天以上就需要自制自动滴水装置了。 6、目前,国外生产出一种小型电脑浇水器,名叫“魔术雨”,只要输入浇水时间、频率和浇水量,它就能按规定进行自动操作。四~“美容师”和“病害源”。
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Miss Chen
10-16
Miss Chen
The distinctive bird of paradise (Strelitzia spp.) is one of the best-known tropical flowers. It is closely related to the banana plant. The bird of paradise plant is named for closely resembling the tropical bird of the same name. It is easier to grow than many tropical plants and makes for a vigorous, rapidly growing indoor plant. It can be moved outside in the summer and thrives outside for half the year. Bird of paradise typically flowers in the late winter or early spring, but it can flower at other times of the year when provided optimal conditions. These plants grow with upright leaves emerging directly from the soil and have no trunk. The large leaves range from 12 to 18 inches long and can get splits in the leaf when exposed to windy conditions or brushed against in a busy hallway. Strelitzia is toxic to cats and dogs.1 Common Name Bird of paradise, crane flower Botanical Name Strelitzia reginae, Strelitzia nicolai Family Strelitziaceae Plant Type Herbaceous perennial Mature Size 3.5-6 ft. tall, 3-4 ft. wide Sun Exposure Full to partial Soil Type Loamy Soil pH Slightly acidic Bloom Time Late winter to early spring Flower Color Orange or white Hardiness Zones 10-12 (USDA) Native Area Africa (South Africa) Toxicity Toxic to pets Bird of Paradise Care Strelitzia are beautiful plants that can be successfully grown inside; however, the biggest drawbacks are their size; they can grow 5 to 6 feet tall. These plants need 3 to 5 years to mature before they flower. They work well in massed plantings outside or as a specimen plant in warm climates, where their flowers rise above the foliage for an impressive display.
The trick to successful growth indoors is bright light with direct sun, regular watering, and warmth. Feed the plant with compost early in spring before new growth begins and fertilize every week during the growing season. To increase survival rate, grow the plant in a container that can be moved outside in warm summer months and returned inside during the winter. Light This plant needs bright light, including some direct sunlight, to bloom well. However, it requires shielding in the direct midday summer sun, which can burn the leaves of younger plants.2 A good position is in a room with windows facing east or west. Avoid rooms with only a north-facing window. Soil Use rich, well-drained potting mix for potted plants or a compost mixture. If using a pot, make sure it has ample drainage holes to allow water to flow through the soil and out of the pot. Water Keep the soil continually moist throughout the year. While it should not be waterlogged, expect to water it daily in the spring and summer as it loses moisture through its big leaves. You can water it until you see the water draining from its drainage holes, but make sure it does not sit in a pool of water. If overwatered, the plant will develop crunchy brown leaves. If underwatered, the leaves farthest from the center will turn yellow. Temperature and Humidity Bird of paradise prefers high humidity. You might want to keep a spray bottle handy to mist it if your home is dry. Keep the air temperature above 60 degrees Fahrenheit in the winter. This is not a cold-tolerant plant, and it recovers slowly from frost damage. Fertilizer This plant is a heavy feeder. Feed it in the springtime with slow-release pellets or weekly during the growing season with liquid fertilizer. Types of Strelitzia There are five Strelitzia species, but only two are commonly grown as indoor plants: S. reginae (orange bird of paradise) and S. nicolai (white bird of paradise). Strelitzia reginae 'Glauca': This orange variety has powdery grayer foliage and stems. Strelitzia reginae 'Humilis' or 'Pygmaea': This orange variety only grows to about 3 feet in size. Strelitzia reginae 'Ovata': This orange variety features rounded leaf blades. Strelitzia juncea: The leafless bird of paradise lacks leaf blades, so its stems and leaves look like reeds. Strelitzia caudata: This 25-foot-tall species grows in the higher elevations of South Africa and is also called the mountain bird of paradise. It blooms with white-and-blue petalled flowers and is the rarest and hardest to obtain. Pruning Birds of paradise flowers last for about three weeks before dropping their petals and dying. Remove old or damaged plant matter. This is the best way to thin the leaves. Remove the leaves by pulling them off or use sharp cutting instruments. Sterilize the implements in between different plants. If a leaf appears mostly healthy, leave it intact. If your plant has grown really large, and you need to do significant cutting down, use loppers, hand pruners, or a pruning saw in the early spring. Do not use hedge trimmers, which leave ragged cuts. You can cut all leaves and stems down to just above the ground. If the plant remains too crowded, use long-handled pruners and remove selected stems and leaves. Propagating Bird of Paradise The best ways to propagate birds of paradise are division and sowing seeds. Division is easier and quicker than growing from seed. It's best to use mature plants that have been previously blooming for at least three years. Here's how to divide strelitzia. To propagate by division: Depending on the size of your plant (and its rhizome or underground root structure), you will need larger instruments like a shovel and saw for in-ground or large plants. For smaller plants, you can use a sharp knife. If potting the division, you will need a new pot and a well-draining potting mix. You can also remove the new growth or offshoots at the base of the plant that has at least three leaves and divide the rhizome below ground with a shovel, saw, or knife. Repot in a new container with a well-draining potting mix. How to Grow Strelitzia From Seed Be patient when growing strelitzia from seeds. It can take two months for the seeds to germinate. Soak seeds in room-temperature water for 24 to 48 hours before planting. Remove any orange stringy material. Nick the seed with a knife or nail file. Plant the seed in a well-draining potting mix about 1/2 to 1 inch deep and at least 3 inches apart from other seeds. Place the container in a warm, indirect sun location (at least 80 degrees Fahrenheit). Cover with a cloche or plastic wrap, keeping the soil moist but not soggy. Once the seedling germinates and produces two to three leaves, transplant to a 6-inch pot. Once your plant reaches 6 inches, it is ready for a more permanent home. Potting and Repotting Strelitzia Bird of paradise is a rapidly-growing plant that needs to reach a certain size before it blooms. A bird of paradise that is 3 to 4 feet tall grows well in a 10-inch pot. A 5- to 6-foot plant usually thrives in a 14-inch pot. Repot it every spring into the next-size-up pot. Once it reaches maturity, allow it to be pot-bound so that it will bloom. You can divide it by the time it has matured or bloomed at least once but do it infrequently since crowded clumps produce the most blooms. Repotting disrupts the bloom cycle. Overwintering If it gets below freezing where you live for a prolonged time, you might kill this plant if you do not take it inside for the winter. However, if you live in an area like zone 9, where it only dips low for short periods, you may be able to overwinter your plant outdoors; but it will need help to survive. To overwinter outdoors, cut the stem and leaves down to just 12 inches above the ground. Cover the entire stem and rhizome area with a layer of mulch, then leaf litter, and straw. Cover that with breathable row cover material and stake it down. As soon as spring arrives and the threat of the last frost is gone, remove the toppings. Common Pests and Plant Diseases Monitor the plant for aphids, scale, and whiteflies.3 If you see them, use insecticidal soap for control and apply it to the undersides of the leaves. Systemic pesticide is also effective. If you use systemic pesticide, the plant will distribute it from its roots through to its leaves and flowers. Bird of paradise is also susceptible to Botrytis cinerea (gray mold).3 Flowers and leaves with this condition will develop dark spots followed by a layer of gray mold. Remove the affected parts of the plant and allow them to air out. How to Get Strelitzia to Bloom Once your plant is at least four to five years old, it is mature enough to bloom. To spur flowering, keep it pot-bound. Give it a lot of sun (at least 6 hours of full sunlight or bright light) and feed it on schedule. One of the most common reasons a bird of paradise fails to flower is insufficient light. These plants should also be kept evenly moist throughout summer, but allow them to dry out between watering. Common Problems With Strelitzia Strelizia is a relatively easy-going plant with very few issues. It is most prone to root rot and insects that prey on the plant when its optimal conditions are not met. But, if it's not overwatered, kept fed, and given ample light and air circulation—it can keep most problems at bay. Wilting or Browning of Leaves The most common disease affecting strelitzia is root rot. When the roots of the plant sit in water or the soil gets soggy for a prolonged amount of time, a fungus that causes root rot can overtake a plant. It can be avoided by letting the soil dry out between waterings. Another sign you have root rot includes a rotting smell. Some plants can be saved if caught early. To fix root rot, pull up the root ball, cutting away blackened, moldy parts of the rhizome, apply a fungicide according to the instructions, and repot in a sterilized container with fresh, well-draining soil.
Curling Leaves Curling leaves are a sign of underwatering. You can avoid this problem by giving more water and making sure that the water runs freely from the bottom of the pot. This thorough watering ensures that all the roots have access to water, but make sure that the plant doesn't sit in that water. Soggy soil can cause other problems. Yellowing Leaves Yellowing leaves can mean several things. First, if the occasion leaf turns yellow, and the plant is a mature plant, it can be the normal life cycle of the leaf of that plant. However, if many leaves begin to yellow it can be a sign that the plant does not have ample humidity, it needs more nutrients, or if the yellowed leaves are toward the outside of the plant, it's not getting sufficiently watered. Increase each of those factors—one at a time—to see if that solves the problem. Slits or Breaks in the Leaves This plant's leaves are large. If your strelitzia develops slits or breaks in the leaves, especially if your plant lives outside for some part of the year, it's natural and normal. The plant develops slits to allow the plant to circulate air around its leaves and roots. Wind and breezes contribute to slitting. Air circulation keeps mold and other pests from settling in.
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