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莹723
19 hours ago
莹723
When natural food is in short supply, birds need our help. What food should you provide? They find most of their food – such as insects, worms, slugs, snails and caterpillars – in the natural environment, but supplementary food in feeders can provide extra help. This is particularly useful when there is too much rain and caterpillars are washed off leaves, or in times of drought, when worms and other grubs retreat far below the soil surface.
——What to feed garden birds Sunflower hearts are a great all-round option. They contain the same high calorie content as sunflower seeds, but don’t have husks and therefore don’t make a mess. If you can provide a range of foods, however, the birds will have a choice and you’re likely to attract a wider selection. For the greatest variety leave out a seed mix, a fat-based product such as fat balls, and a protein-rich source such as mealworms. Many gardeners leave out peanuts for the birds, but these aren’t always popular. This is due to the energy required to eat a peanut – birds have to manipulate the food in their beaks before they can swallow it, whereas other foods, such as sunflower hearts, enable them to simply grab and swallow. Larger birds, like jays and woodpeckers, can manage peanuts, and tits will persevere if they’re all that’s on offer. Dried foods are good for year-round feeding and store well for months in a sealed container. However, live or rehydrated mealworms are a good option in spring and summer, as they help to ensure chicks in the nest get the moisture they need.
——Where to feed garden birds While tits and finches are expert at clinging to feeders, blackbirds, dunnocks and robins are much happier foraging on a flat surface, such as a bird table, short grass or paving. The latter also makes it easier for you to clear up spillage if you need to. In fact, good hygiene is a must. A bird-feeding area can be a hotbed for disease, so clean your feeders weekly using a weak disinfectant solution, rinse well before allowing them to dry and then refilling. It’s also important to move the location of feeders every month, to prevent the build up of bacteria in any one area. You can try to tailor your mixes to the season, but it’s easier to simply adjust what you feed according to what gets eaten – birds are good at telling you what they need. Because birds need natural food, it’s vital to ensure that your garden is full of seeds, berries and particularly insects. Grow caterpillar foodplants such as native trees and shrubs, allow weeds to flourish at the back of your borders and consider letting and area of grass grow long. Ditching insecticides and digging a pond will also increase insect abundance in your garden, providing masses more food for garden birds.
——How to feed garden birds in winter Snows and hard frosts are a real killer for birds, but relentless cold rain can be just as bad, and of course winter days are so short for foraging. Garden birds are focused on survival and getting enough calories to see them through each day and night. Put out a full spread of seeds and nuts such as sunflower seeds, hearts and peanuts, plus suet treats such as insect or fruit nibbles, and fat balls. You can also include scraps such as grated cheese and crumbled pastry, plus fat from unsalted cuts of meat.
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莹723
11-23
莹723
1——DIY Pumpkin Vase Centerpiece Subtlety is key when it comes to Thanksgiving centerpieces. You've already got so much on the table—why crowd it further? Here, a stunning, quiet arrangement of faux flowers and branches is more than enough to make a serious statement.
2——White Centerpiece Fall decor isn't all about oranges, yellows, and reds. Dried hydrangeas and white, antler-like decorations can make for an equally gorgeous monochrome centerpiece. Candles bring warmth, and faux pumpkins add texture.
3——Whitewash Pinecones These pale pinecones are pretty enough to display on their own, or in this simple arrangement featuring gourds, berries, and succulents.
4——Bold Red Centerpiece A vibrant arrangement is a guaranteed head-turner at any dinner party, but it'll be especially appreciated on Thanksgiving Day. Dahlias, roses, and ranunculus will fit right in with all the red-hued pies and cranberry sauce on your table.
5——Retro Cooler Vase If Thanksgiving tends to be a casual shindig in your home, use a vintage jug cooler and foraged branches, leaves, and flowers from your backyard.
6——Natural Reeds Centerpiece Dried reeds and grasses make for a totally unexpected Thanksgiving centerpiece. Evoking the earthiness of the fall season, their muted tones and subdued color palette is sure to elicit more than a few oohs and aahs from your guests.
7——Seasonal Spices Mix and match wildflowers and vintage spice cans in autumnal hues according to the length of your table. Display two for small settings, and a series for longer setups. 8——Metallic Maize Give a plain ol' vase some fall flair with this easy idea. Start by coating roughly 14 cobs of dried corn with metallic gold and copper spray paint. Once dry, hot-glue cobs to the perimeter of a 6-inch round vase. Tie it all together with gold raffia. Fill vase with floral foam and add seasonal flowers as desired. (This sampling includes dahlias, zinnias, and mountain ash berries.)
9——Wheat Cloches Start by bundling a small handful of wheat and tie with twine. Turn a cloche upside down and place the wheat inside, then top with base and invert. Add leftover snips of wheat to securing with twine.
10——Go Green! A scattering of green gourds and acorn squash laid down the center of the table and accented with orange and red flowers creates quite a pretty site. Bonus: Hot glue acorns to lengths of brown waxed twine and use to tie up rolled napkins. Apply gold leaf to a portion of a preserved maple leaf and use a gold paint pen to mark with guest's initials.
11——Pumpkin Vase Remove the top quarter of a small pumpkin. Scoop out the seeds and pulp and fill with floral foam and flowers (here, dahlias, scabiosa, strawflowers, zinnias, forget-me-nots, and nigella). Surround your centerpiece with acorns, squash, and other seasonal elements.
12——Foliage-Inspired Florals Bring some autumnal beauty indoors with this arrangement inspired by the yellow, orange, red, and purple leaves on the trees. A vintage trophy makes the perfect vessel for a big bunch of blooms.
13——Use a Vintage Vessel A vintage blue-and-white transferware tureen stuffed full of white and yellow flowers, with hints of greenery, looks great as a Thanksgiving table centerpiece. Bonus: Decoupage a white pumpkin with blue and white toile wallpaper.
14——Frilly Lace Pumpkins Hot glue lace and sewing trim on orange pumpkins and sprinkle them down the center of the table. Orange flower and bittersweet add a soft touch. Bonus: Form napkins into a bow shape and slip a gold napkin ring over the center.
15——Thanksgiving Table Centerpiece This floral pumpkin centerpiece may look ornate, but it's actually incredibly easy to make. The crafter in question simply carved a gourd and filled it with a bouquet she got from the grocery store!
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莹723
11-16
莹723
Tender orchids are one of the most popular houseplants, but to keep them flourishing and flowering, it’s important to avoid some common mistakes. Moth orchids are arguably the most popular and commonly grown orchids, found everywhere from garden centres to supermarkets. They enjoy a constant temperature of around 18°C, so are best grown indoors all year round. Other orchids, like dendrobiums, cymbidiums and oncidiums need a minimum evening temperature of 10°C, so can be moved outside in summer to a bright spot out of direct sunlight.
1——Using the wrong pots If you’re growing moth orchids (Phalaenopsis) you need to grow them in clear containers to allow the green roots to photosynthesise. Dendrobiums and cymbidiums don’t have photosynthetic roots, so can be grown in opaque pots. Vandas don’t need any pot at all, and can be grown in empty vases or suspended from wires. 2——Overpotting Re-pot orchids in spring when the roots have filled the pot, this is usually carried out each year. Don’t let them remain in the same compost for over two years. Don’t overpot orchids as the compost won’t dry out fast enough, leading to root rot. Choose a pot that is just bigger and always use orchid compost. 3——Poor watering Orchids roots are very susceptible to root rot, so it’s important that they’re never sitting in water. Water orchids by dunking the whole container in water, then draining, or from above and again allow to drain. Tepid water is ideal, tepid rainwater even better. 4——The wrong light Most orchids, including phalaenopsis, dendrobiums and cymbidiums need indirect sunlight, as direct sunlight can scorch the leaves. They enjoy high humidity, so it’s worth buying a spray bottle to give them a good mist.
5——Not deadheading Orchids are grown for their flowers, so it’s essential that they’re deadheaded correctly to encourage more flowers. Moth orchids flower multiple times on one stem, so cut off faded flowers just above the next flower bud. On other orchids you can cut the old flower stem right to the base. 6——Avoid terracotta pots When potting and repotting orchids, it’s best to steer clear of terracotta pots – the orchid’s roots will fasten themselves to the surface, making it difficult to repot in future.
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莹723
11-13
莹723
•Plant size 80cm height 80cm spread •Average Yield 4.5kg-13.5kg per 3m row •Spacing 1.6m apart Rhubarb is easy to grow, producing masses of delicious stalks every year. Only the rhubarb stalks are edible. Never eat rhubarb leaves as these are extremely poisonous – compost these instead. Plant rhubarb in fertile, free-draining soil with added organic matter, such as well-rotted horse manure. Allow plenty of space around the plant so it can spread out. Water during dry periods and mulch annually, in autumn. It’s a good idea to remove any flower stems when they appear to direct energy back into stem production. To harvest rhubarb, take the entire stem, gently twisting and then pulling it upwards from the base. Find out more about growing rhubarb, below.
——How to grow rhubarb The best way to plant rhubarb is to plant rhubarb crowns. Crowns are offsets cut from divisions of vigorous parent plants – usually they will be a piece of root with at least one dormant bud visible. Plant them in late autumn, 90cm or more apart, depending on the eventual spread of your chosen cultivar. Rhubarb will grow well in a sunny, open site, on a wide range of soils, as long as it has been well-prepared with plenty of manure or compost. If you like the challenge of growing from seed, sow rhubarb outdoors in spring in a seedbed, thinning to 15cm apart and then once more to 30cm apart. The quality of seed-grown rhubarb can vary, so be ruthless in selecting the strongest plants to grow on. Plant out your chosen plants in a permanent site in autumn or spring.
——Caring for rhubarb Rhubarb doesn’t need much attention and once established rhubarb plants will be productive for around 10 years. Maintaining soil fertility is the key to keeping plants healthy. Mulch around the base of plants with home-made compost, well-rotted manure and leaf mould, to suppress weeds and retain soil moisture. Giving plants a liquid feed in spring will also aid strong growth. To get the sweetest and earliest crop of rhubarb you need to force rhubarb plants to produce stems before they would normally be ready. This simply means covering the crowns in early winter, to block out the light. You can use a bin or bucket, or a traditional terracotta rhubarb forcer – any cover that’s at least 45cm high. Your rhubarb plants will have developed tender stems after around five weeks. If you have a greenhouse or garage, you can lift rhubarb plants to force indoors, for an even earlier crop. Dig up crowns in November and leave them on the soil surface to chill for two weeks. This will break dormancy. Then pot up each crown in compost, before moving into a cool indoor spot, and then cover. It’s best to wait until your plants are well-established before forcing rhubarb, as it takes quite a lot of energy from the plant. Forced rhubarb plants will not usually produce much of a crop later on, but can be divided and replanted in summer.
——Harvesting rhubarb Harvest rhubarb stems when they’re green or red. For strong and healthy growth, don’t harvest rhubarb in the first year, and take only a few stalks in the second. If you have established plants, three or more years old, rhubarb is ready to harvest from spring onwards, as soon as the stalks are long enough – between 30-60cm, depending on the variety. There’s no need to use a knife, simply pull and twist the stems off the plant, as this stimulates fresh new growth. Forced rhubarb is usually ready in late winter to early spring. The stems will be shorter, but sweeter.
——Storing rhubar Rhubarb is at its most delicious when cooked after being freshly picked. However, it can be frozen, raw and cut into chunks, or after cooking. Traditionally rhubarb is stewed or baked and served with custard or in a pie or crumble.
——Growing rhubarb: problem solving Rhubarb plants can be prone to honey fungus, crown rot and viruses. Any of these diseases will weaken the plant and it is best to dig up affected plants and start again on a new site. Crown rot is the most common. It’s a fungal infection at the base of the stalks, and causes the crowns to turn brown and soft. Unfortunately there’s no remedy.
——Rhubarb varieties to try •Rheum x hybridum ‘Timperley Early’ – ideal for forcing, this will produce tender pink stems in February. But even unforced, it is one of the earliest varieties, ready to harvest from March •Rheum x hybridum ‘Stockbridge Arrow’ – long, thick stems with a good colour and sweet flavour. Leaves are arrow-shaped and very ornamental, which makes it a great choice for mixed borders and smaller gardens. H: 60cm x S:1.2m •Rheum x hybridum ‘Cawood Delight’ – a relatively new variety, producing dark pinky-red stems with a good shine and flavour. Although valued for its high quality stems, it produces smaller yields and is not suitable for forcing. H:1.4m x S:1.4m •Rheum x hybridum ‘Victoria’ – an old and reliable variety, reputedly named after Queen Victoria. It produces high yields of long stems with a sweet flavour and good texture and can be harvested as baby stems, forced or simply left to mature. H:1.4m x S:1.4m •Rheum x hybridum ‘Fulton’s Strawberry Surprise’ – a newer introduction with vivid red stems on strong, vigorous plants. H:1.4m x S:1.4m •Rheum x hybridum ‘Livingstone’ – a new variety that crops in autumn and spring
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莹723
11-04
莹723
Bottle gardens, or terrariums, are enjoying a revival, and they’re easy to create.The key is to combine small plants that thrive in similar growing conditions – usually either damp shade or drought. You can plant a bottle garden in virtually any glass vessel, though closed ones are best for moisture lovers and open ones best for plants used to drier conditions. Don’t worry if you can’t find what we used – look in charity shops, garden centres, your kitchen cupboard or on the internet for something that appeals.
You Will Need •Vintage glass bottle •Horticultural grit •Peat free houseplant compost •Moss, (from the lawn) •Spathiphyllum 'Chopin' •Fittonia verschaffeltii •Syngonium 'White Butterfly' •Chlorophytum comosum 'Ocean' •Peperomia rotundifolia
Total time: 20 minutes Step 1 Put 5cm of horticultural grit in the bottom of the bottle for drainage. Add houseplant compost till the bottle is about a third full – breaking up any lumps with your hands. Choose lush foliage plants that thrive in low light and humidity.
Step 2 Position the plants one at a time, planting them as you would in a container – firm the compost around them. Fill gaps between plants with a layer of moss.
Step 3 Water sparingly down the sides of the bottle as the curved sides will prevent a lot of evaporation. Ensure the compost doesn’t dry out or become saturated with water. Place in a bright spot out of direct sunlight.
Alternative plants for a bottle garden • Maidenhair fern (Adiantum raddianum) • Golden polypody (Phlebodium aureum) • Hares foot fern (Humata tyermannii) • Mind-your-own-business (Soleirolia soleirolii) • Centella (Centella asiatica) • Cacti and succulents
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莹723
11-03
莹723
Staying at home or self-isolating during the coronavirus outbreak might be challenging, especially for people who live on their own. Stay upbeat and active during the coronavirus outbreak. Gardening can help us turn this situation into a positive – we can sow seeds or plant seedlings now and watch them grow and bloom over the coming weeks and months. Here are 10 garden jobs you can get on with now. They’ll help you to pass the time in a productive and purposeful way, getting you outdoors to enjoy fresh air, bird song and a bit of exercise. 1.Sow seeds Sowing seeds and watching the plants grow is a great way to relieve stress. You could sow anything you fancy – annual herbs to use in cooking, flowers such as cosmos and sunflowers to brighten up the garden, or vegetables to use in nutritious meals later in the season. Use a seed tray and propagator if you have one, but pots filled with peat-free compost and covered with a clear plastic bag or clingfilm will work just as well.
2.Plant up a container display A pretty container display can really help to lift the spirits. Consider asking someone to go to the garden centre for you, or buy mail-order plants or seeds. Choose from perennial plants that are in flower now, which you can transplant into the garden when they’re past their best, or annuals for a quick, seasonal display.
3.Feed the birds Feeding the birds is great way to entertain yourself while self-isolating at home. Hang feeders in front of a window where you sit regularly, so you can watch the antics of the birds from your sofa. Buy feeders and food online from a reputable supplier and avoid cheaper seed mixes if possible – these are less likely to attract garden birds. Sunflower hearts are a great all-round choice, attracting a wide range of species. Why not take the time to learn the different birds that visit the feeders while you’re at it?
4.Clean the greenhouse For many people, there’s never a good time to clean the greenhouse. But doing so will bring more light to tender seedlings growing inside, as well as remove harmful pests and pathogens, which could be lingering on from last year. This is a great, active job that might help you to work up a sweat – get your scrubbing brush, sponge and hosepipe ready, for mini workout.
5.Install a water butt If you’ve been meaning to install a water butt for a while then now’s the time to do it. You can buy whole kits online and simply follow instructions on installing it. Wall-mounted water butts are a great way to save space. It’s fairly straightforward to connect them to a downpipe from your house, shed or greenhouse.
6.Build a garden pond A pond is one of the best garden habitats you can create for wildlife, attracting birds, amphibians, mammals and aquatic insects. Digging a pond is labour intensive but extremely rewarding – if you’re missing your gym then this is the job for you. Buy pond liner online and see if you can source plants from your local garden centre – again, see if they will deliver. If not, there are plenty of online retailers that sell pond plants. Choose a mix of oxygenating, floating and submerged plants, to provide the best variety of habitats. Once you’ve dug your pond, consider buying a book on freshwater life, and a pond net, then monitor which new species colonise the water. There’s a whole new world to explore beneath the surface.
7.Build a raised bed A raised bed makes growing vegetables easier, particularly if you have heavy soil. It can also be useful if you have a disability or mobility issues. You can buy raised bed kits or make your own using old scaffolding planks. Then simply fill with topsoil and start planting.
8.Make a bee hotel A bee hotel provides nesting habitat for solitary bees such as red mason bees, which are on the wing from April to June, and leafcutter bees, which are flying from June to August. Rather than forming large nests like bumblebees and honeybee, solitary bees lay individual eggs in cells, stocked with nectar and pollen for the grubs to eat when they hatch. They don’t sting. Fix your bee hotel to a south-east facing wall or fence, and keep an eye out for bee activity throughout summer.
9.Grow houseplants If you don’t have a garden, or can’t get into the garden, you can bring a touch of the outdoors, in. Houseplants have been shown to clean the air in our homes, as well as lift our spirits. Planting up a few containers of choice houseplants will not only keep you occupied, but will provide you with a long season of interest. There are plenty of online houseplant retailers, and you can buy pots, compost and decorative pebbles online, too.
10.Design a new border Have you been putting off revamping that garden border? Now is as good a time as any. Whether you’re after a prairie look, a woodland border or a gravel garden, we’ve got all the inspiration you need. Take on the project wisely – plan beforehand, carefully choosing which plants to grow and working out where to grow them. Buy your plants, and any other resources online, and – a new look for your garden.
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莹723
11-03
莹723
How could we not love Squash? It grows in many different flavors and textures, and just keeps producing and producing. Winter squash need tons of room to stretch because their vines sprawl 10 to 15 feet in every direction; train the plants up a trellis or fence to conserve space. Harvest winter squash when the rind can’t be pierced with your thumbnail, around the time when the vines wither or even right after the first light frost.
1.Acorn Squash Shaped like its namesake, these popular winter squash are reliable performers. They’re best baked or stuffed. Types of Acorn Squash: Honey Bear, Jester
2.Buttercup Squash These easy-to-grow, turban-shaped squash store well into late winter and are buttery-sweet and satiny when baked and mashed. Bake, puree, and add olive oil and romano cheese for an out-of-this-world sauce to toss with pasta. Types of Buttercup Squash: Burgess, Bonbon
3.Butternut Squash Butternuts are typically cylindrical with a bulb-shaped end and a classic, tan rind. You’ll need a few weeks of storage for the flavor to develop, but they last for months and months. They are prolific producers! Bake, sauté, or add to stews. Types of Butternut Squash: Honeybaby, Waltham
4.Delicata Squash This heirloom variety has cream and green-striped oblong fruits about three inches wide and six inches long. They’re extremely tender, with a flavor reminiscent of sweet potatoes. And unlike many winter squash, the rind is edible. Heads up: They don't store quite as long as some of the other winter squashes. Types of Delicata Squash: Bush Delicata
5.Dumpling Squash These multi-colored squashes with a squat little shape are both pretty and edible. They’re prolific producers, and they can be baked, grilled, steamed, or stuffed. Types of Dumpling Squash: Sweet Dumpling, Carnival
6.Hubbard Squash These squash, popular in New England, have a tough, bumpy rind and range in color from bright orange to a gorgeous aqua-blue color. Some varieties weigh in at 12 to 15 pounds each! Roast the medium-sweet flesh, or chunk it for stews. Types of Hubbard Squash: Red Kuri, Blue Ballet
7.Kabocha Squash These Japanese squash are similar in appearance to a buttercup, with a flavor that’s reminiscent of sweet potatoes. Bake, steam, or purée in soups. Types of Kabocha Squash: Sunshine, Hokkori
8.Pumpkin Squash Pumpkins actually are a type of winter squash. While some varieties are not particularly tasty, and are grown for carving, others are quite sweet! Bake, steam, put in stews, and roast the seeds, or of course make a pumpkin pie. They're easy to grow! Types of Pumpkin Squash: Pepitas, Super Moon, Hijinks
9.Spaghetti Squash These oblong-shaped squash have stringy flesh you can scrape out after cooking to create spaghetti-like strands. Use as a pasta substitute or in soups. Types of Spaghetti Squash: Sugaretti, Tivoli
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莹723
10-26
莹723
Most gardens contain a mix of different plants, including perennials, annuals, shrubs and trees. Understanding the different types means you’ll understand how they grow, helping you to care for them correctly and ensure that it looks good all year round. 1.Annuals Annuals complete their entire life cycle – growing from seed, flowering, making more seed, then dying – in one year (their name comes from the Latin ‘annus’, meaning ‘year’). They produce two types of bright, showy flowers in summer.
(Pink zinnias) Hardy annuals can withstand the cold, so you can sow them outdoors in spring – March or April are the usual times but they can also be sown in September. They include cornflowers, love-in-a mist and nasturtiums. Half-hardy annuals cannot survive the cold, so they are generally sown indoors in spring and planted out in May or June. They include cosmos and zinnias. 2.Biennials Biennials take two years to complete their life cycle – they are sown in one year and flower and die in the next (their name comes from the Latin word, ‘biennis’, which means ‘two years’. They often flower in late spring, before annuals and perennials get going. The most common biennial in our gardens is the foxglove.
(Magenta and pink foxglove flowers) 3.Perennials Perennials live for three years or more – their name comes the Latin, ‘perennis’, which means ‘many years’. They are sometimes referred to ‘herbaceous perennials’. They can flower for several months in summer. There are two types:
(Tall, pink-red lupins) Hardy perennials can survive the winter and are left in the ground all year round. Don’t be alarmed when they seem to ‘disappear’ in winter – it’s a survival mechanism to get through the cold weather. Their foliage dies back but the rootstock remains dormant underground. New shoots then appear in spring. Popular perennials include lupins, delphiniums, cranesbills, hostas and peonies. Half-hardy perennials cannot cope with the cold and so must be brought indoors in winter. It’s best to grow this type of plant in a pot, so that you can move it around easily. Alternatively, you could plant fresh plants every year. Half hardy perennials include many fuchsias and heliotrope. 4.Shrubs Shrubs, such as roses and lavender, have a woody branches and no trunk. They lose their leaves in winter), evergreen (they keep their leaves year-round) or semi-evergreen (they keep their leaves in mild winters). Shrubs add structure and can last for many years, offering flowers, attractive foliage, colourful autumn leaves or berries. Evergreen types can be used as topiary, clipped into attractive shapes.
(Pale-apricot rose ‘Grace’) 5.Trees Trees have a trunk and are larger than shrubs. They can be deciduous or evergreen. However small your garden, you can squeeze in a tree – it will change beautifully throughout the year and also acts as a high-rise home for wildlife.
(silver birch tree) 6.Climbers Climbers grow upwards, and need support in the form of a trellis, arch, fence or wall. Popular climbers include clematis, honeysuckle, wisteria and jasmine. They take up very little room so are especially useful in small gardens. Use them around seating areas – over a pergola, for example – and to cover walls and fences.
(Lilac wisteria flowers) 7.Bulbs Bulbs are underground storage organs and there are several different kinds – true bulbs, corms, tubers and rhizomes. They are planted in autumn or spring for spring or summer flowers. They include a wide range of popular garden plants including daffodils (pictured), tulips, bluebells, crocus, irises and dahlias.
(Daffodils) 8.Bedding plants Bedding plants are planted temporarily in flower beds or borders, pots or window boxes, giving a display of flowers for a few months. Bedding plants are often half-hardy annuals or tender perennials, but can also be bulbs or shrubs. Popular bedding plants include pelargoniums (geraniums), begonias, petunias and pansies.
(Purple and yellow pansies) Like our articles? Let us know in the comments!
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